A Place of Future Past

I’ve come to appreciate the process my photography reveals to me, where it comes from to where it takes me. Some of my best and most enjoyable moments of capturing images have occurred without any agenda or expectations of what I’ll find. Of course, there are many times when the circumstances are not so much by chance but in these cases, there are expectations in place and the surprises of the moments are much narrower. Also, this is not to say that planning has kept me from getting images I enjoy. There are many, many places I’d like to go and photograph where planning and logistics would be a likely factor to get to “the place” at the right time.

A problem with being in a situation where you feel rushed can impact how good or not so good the experience becomes. There’s nothing worse than finding out that the shots were less than ideal after all the planning you did to be at a great place and you missed the moments completely right from under your nose. Or worse yet, feeling like the situation is in a “meltdown” and the moments speed away faster than your imagination right out of your grasp. For me the reality has been that there are always surprises in every situation that can disappoint to many degrees. There’s a better way to get through the surprises. Try and make a surprise out of the surprise. These situations will usually remind me that I really enjoy taking pictures and in the worst case scenario, I’ll just wing it – something good will usually happen.

Now, missing moments when shooting landscape and scenery is far from any equivalent of what I’d call a tragedy but many “diva spins” including my own, have occurred from far-less complicated situations.

This takes me back to the process I’ve come to appreciate about my photography. The lessons have come as tragedies that I’ve created and some as enlightenment I’ve received. The truth is that I’ve ended at “a place” that’s infinitely bigger than I am… A place that has been the stage for the past and will be for the future.

East Met West Contrast

I’ve heard that there’s an old saying in north Texas that Dallas looks to the east and Fort Worth looks to the west in the Metroplex. The views vary particularly about the “other” depending on who you talk to, usually based on qualms about traffic, crime, schools, property values, and… attitude. Yes, the ego or the claim to the lack of it becomes familiar sport if you ask enough people about these two cities. There is a premise that everything is bigger and better in the “Big D” and it is apparent from the new skyscraper real estate, the exotic cars and fortune 500 companies you see. This new money has spawned arts and cultural centers, sporting and entertainment venues, shopping malls, fine dining and trendy nightlife, familiar of the big city cosmopolitan lifestyle. Fort Worth on the other hand has more of an old west character. It’s a much more laid back feel and somewhat slower paced yet full of local arts and culture where you’d be more akin to see a businessman in a cowboy hat and boots or not think there’s a costume party/event when you see cowboys walking around. The stockyards and livestock industry is part of its heritage and in recent years it has been promoting itself as the “City of Cowboys and Culture.” Many of the communities around Fort Worth are well established and the sense of the open range becomes apparent when you venture west of the city limits.

According to the US Census Bureau the DFW Metroplex encompasses 9,286 square miles, 12 counties,  the cities of Arlington, Irving and the Mid-Cities to name a few with a population of 6.8+ million as of July 2009. It ranks as the fourth largest populated metropolitan area in the US and tenth largest in the Americas. It gained 147,000 residents during the period of July 2008 to July 2009. It has always been a major rail transportation hub and the same is true for the airline industry.

Both cities have plenty to do and the difference sometimes is only what satisfies the ego. New money ambiance or old money traditionalism. Uptown sophistication or old west, cow town/funky town character. Performing arts, live music and sports venues or art museums, botanical gardens and family music festivals. The population has the choice of both plus what all the other cities in the area offer where the majorities reside. East has met West in this progressive Metroplex in Texas

Diamonds In The Sky

I’ve always been fascinated with clouds because I associate them as part of the Earth’s spirit displayed in one of its most elegant visual metaphors. When I see how they move and change into shapes as the climate dictates, I can’t help but feel my own spirit connected to the Earth. Sometimes they look like a beautiful Serengeti migration in the sky moving along in the wind or they convect into bold displays of grandeur. Sometimes they hug the lowlands as fog or ascend to wispy layers of strata. When I take the time to watch them it’s like seeing life move in slow motion and it brings calm to my soul. When they leave us with only beautiful cloudless skies, I know they will always return in new shape and form for they are truly free spirits and masters of their realm.

Imagination – What do you see?

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There’s a children’s picture book series out on the horizon called the “The Cloud Seekers”, written by Robert L. Calixto.  It’s still in the early stages due out next year but the concept is about a group of friends who explore the possibilities in what takes shape in the clouds.  A simple concept, reminiscent of a time I remember and certainly fun to share with little ones.

Cloud Light

DSCF0055This Mother of a cloud illuminates and reflects off the water with the Channel Islands and an offshore platform in the distance. Taken 1-3-05 at 5:54 PM, just north of Refugio Beach State Park, CA.  The cool thing about this image for me is that my Mother and I watched this scene for about half an hour as the light dissipated from the cloud.